Equality of the… eyes! Here are 5 interesting facts of how gender plays a role in our vision

Bhavin Shah. London. We’ve all had a difference with the way in which we see shades of colours but what is especially unique is the different ways that men and women see colour. As a Behavioural Optometrist at Central Vision Opticians and as Chief Optometric Officer and co-founder of a vision tech start-up, I have come across my fair share of differing opinions of vision. Below I  have listed the most interesting facts regarding gender and the eyes. You know what they say… men are from Mars and women are from Venus!

  1. A 2012 study from City University of New York found that women work better with tasks that involve paint swatches or colour palettes. This means that women can distinguish between the shades of primary colors much more so than men can.
  2. However, it seems like colour blindness is a likely trait amongst men. Colour blindness is a problem in the way men see pigments which makes it difficult for them to distinguish between colours. It is a genetic disorder that is rarely found in women.
  3. Alas, although there is a higher chance of colour blindness, researchers have discovered that men are better adjusted to sudden movements and rapidly changing images. This trait might have something to do with computer games or simply a natural genetic evolvement that has been passed down from our ancestors traditional roles as hunters.
  4. But, women are more perceptive to rapid colour changes. Researches found that men require a longer wavelength of a colour to identify the same shade as a woman. This means women can differentiate between hues fairly quickly which is why a simple blue might not be as simple as you think for some women.
  5. Because of the testosterone levels in men’s body (25%), their visual cortexes are better processed. What I mean by this is that the visual systems of men work better than women’s when distinguishing the changes in brightness from space like for example, recognising faces or reading letters from an eye chart.

About the Author Bhavin Shah

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